REBIRTH BRASS BAND featuring SOULJA SLIM / “You Don’t Want To Go To War”


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5 Responses to “REBIRTH BRASS BAND featuring SOULJA SLIM / “You Don’t Want To Go To War””

Qawi Robinson Says:
September 12th, 2006 at 11:02 am

Thanks for the exposure. I was impressed by the musicianship that this Band shows. Explicit lyrics aside, this is more than a High School/College Band. “You don’t want to go to war” is powerful, musically and lyrically. It is actually two songs or movements.

I guess each region has their own type of “unihibited” music and groups. The equivalent of Rebirth and their style of music in the Washington DC Metropolitan area is Go-Go. Where Rebirth is Brass heavy, Go-Go bands are percussion heavy. African rhythms, cowbells, congas, and roto-toms. Even with the musical differences, the passion, energy, edgy lyrics, and cadence is very similar.

Neither music can really be classified…unless you call it raw or gutteral funk.


Editor B Says:
September 12th, 2006 at 12:09 pm

I was thinking about Kalamu and Slim because I just watched NO Exposed last night. One of my wife’s students loaned it to her. Then, listening to this track again today, I just had to come back and say: Thanks for this post.

“This wild music is so full of life precisely because it is joy snatched from the jaws of merciless, oppressive poverty.”

So true. I’ve long thought that the soulfulness of New Orleans comes from pain. I would like to see us minimize the pain. Does that mean we’d lose the soul? I don’t know, but it doens’t look like we’ll confront that dilemma anytime soon.


youngblood Says:
September 12th, 2006 at 11:37 pm

I would be remiss in my duty as a lover of music if when running across a blog featuring Brass Band music of New Orleans, especially the revival or I should say the progression of traditional New Orleans music, and not at least mention Mr. Danny Barker.

Mr. Barker is principally responsible for Fairview Baptist Church to The Dirty Dozen and Rebirth. Roger, Blodie, Kirk, Kermit, Jamil and all the rest will tell you that it was Danny Barker who not only taught them the music but the preeminent banjo and guitarist gave first-hand accounts of the history of jazz from pre-Armstrong era through bebop. Danny played with all of “the cats” and could tell stories, the intimate details of which, you will never hear in jazz history or biographies. Danny was a beautiful man who was always willing to teach and share what he had.

I met Mr. Barker in the mid seventies at Xavier University where he was teaching music appreciation. Danny Barker’s class was always the first to close and everyone who took his class received an A. Not because he gave out A’s freely. Every student earned an excellent grade because Danny had a gift of instilling a genuine love for music. Danny had a wealth of both musician friends and talent both of which he utilized with amazing results in class. Students and teachers would literally crowd outside the door trying to catch a riff or anecdote. He was a master storyteller and communicator and students sensed genuineness in him. I personally took the class eight times and never once for credit.

On Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2:00pm the cats in the jazz lab would hang out on the quad and wait for Mr. Barker to stroll by. He was our ticket into the class and we were looked up to by others by virtue of the fact that we were with him. Holding out a dollar bill, he once asked me to get him a cup of coffee from the student center. That was the first and last time he ever had to ask. Every time after that I always brought him his coffee to that class in the band room and was proud to do it. The man played with everyone from Pops to Bird.

Danny Barker showed up for class on the first day of school in or around 1978-79 only to find out he had been fired. Most of the cats at XU who were into jazz left soon thereafter. It was a classless move by the university.

I soon found myself at Willie Metcalf’s Academy of Black Arts. Willie immediately sent me over to Danny Barker’s house to get the New Orleans music. The Academy was on St. Bernard and London Avenues, right down from The Circle Food Store and right across from the hot tamale stand that didn’t really sell hot tamales. Danny lived on Sere Street right across from the St. Bernard project. On the walk over I was going over in my mind how I was going to show this man all the respect and appreciation I could muster. When I finally knock on the door (Blue) Lu Barker greeted me and almost before I could say good evening invited me in, sat me down and offered me something to drink. It may not sound like much but these were world-class people in every sense of the term treating me like I should have been treating them. I don’t know how many times we went over Royal Garden Blues.

This is the kind of life, the kind of reverence for culture and humanity that is fostered in the society of Black folks in New Orleans. Our sons are connected to our fathers by spiritual bonds, cultural bonds, by bonds that are hard to express with words. But once it has touched you, once you have felt it you know Black people culture in New Orleans is unique. Do they still make em like that? Do they still make men and women like Danny and Blue Lu Barker?

“Box-back coat
Stetson hat
Twenty-dollar gold piece (to let the boys know I was)
Standing pat”


BEE Says:
March 9th, 2007 at 2:34 pm

MAN SLIM THE REALEST NIGGA EVER HE WAS BOUT HIS I WANT 2 BE JUST LIKE HIM TILL I HERD HIS SONG (YEAH) THE STATEMENT HE SAID WAS- U WANT 2 BE LIKE ME BUT U DINT NO HOW 1ST THING BE ORINAL CAUSE WHEN U HAVE YOUR STYLE NIGGA FELL U MORE- I WISH I HAD GOT A CHANCE 2 MEET HIM


Muscle3 Says:
October 23rd, 2008 at 10:59 am

man rebirth is one of them bands that never dies,when i heard u dont wanna go to war,ive back flipped in my mind cause slim was letting it known that rebirth is a living joice of music and when he said we only wanna see foot work that let it be known new orleans got a go on and its real a heard me


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